Wattle Day in Australia.  Over the years various people have promoted the idea of celebrating wattle day, on the first day of our Spring.  AJ Campbell,  a Victorian field naturalist and bird lover suggested in the 1880s we could make  1  September Wattle Day.  Some saw it as a way to express patriotism, for instance during World War I.  Sprigs of wattle were sent to diggers overseas.   The golden burst of the wattles remains one the beautiful features of the Australian Bush, across the length and breadth of the land.  The sight of the first wattles in Spring must have brought joy to all, both the aboriginal inhabitants and the early settlers.  The bright blooms heralded the beginning of a season of growth and for the settlers, a new harvest.  For the aborigines the wattles would be be a sign of welcome warmth to come, and a harvest of wattle seeds for baking.  All would have appreciated the beauty of the transformed landscape. The Wattle also heralds the change from winter into the times of flowering and breeding for so many of our wild species.  In Seymour, wattles are already starting to flower.  Spreading Wattle with its pale cream flowers has been out for a few weeks and Golden Wattle – the main Wattle Day species – is about to paint the landscape with gold. Historically and ecologically it is a perfect symbol of Australia.  LD. 1.8.18